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Museums, libraries win grants to enhance learning online

$150,000 in Grants Part of Larger Effort to Build a Learning Approach for Our Times

Washington, D.C., July 10, 2013 – Sixteen museums, libraries and nonprofit institutions have been awarded a total of $150,000 to engage young people in the development of apps, badges, curricula and other tools that will make the online experience more  civil, safe and empowering. The Project:Connect Summer Youth Programming Competition is supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, administered by Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (HASTAC), and was carried out in collaboration with Mozilla. The Competition this year is also part of the Project:Connect initiative that includes collaboration with Facebook and the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI).

Competing for grants of up to $10,000 each to support single or multi-day summer programs, the 266 applicants from 41 states plus Washington, D.C., included libraries, community organizations, advocacy groups, museums, non-profits, cultural organizations, youth-serving institutions, and arts organizations.

“The competition this year is designed to engage young people in solving a real-world challenge – making the Internet a safer and more powerful place to advance learning,” said Connie Yowell, Director of Education at the MacArthur Foundation. “The ability to meet that challenge will help determine whether education will be more relevant to both young people and the economy where they will be eventually looking for work.”

The Project:Connect Summer Youth Programming Competition is part of the 5th annual Digital Media and Learning Competition. It kicked off May 9 with a daylong hackathon in New York City hosted by Facebook, the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI), MacArthur and Mozilla in collaboration with HASTAC. This year’s HASTAC Digital Media and Learning Competition, supported by the MacArthur Foundation, will encourage the development of apps, badges, curricula, and other tools to enhance learning through making the online experience for young people more civil, safe, and empowering. It includes the hackathon in New York City in May, the Summer Youth Programming Competition, and a $1.2 million open competition that will launch in the fall.

Proposals were evaluated for their potential to:

  • Actively contribute to the goal of a more equitable, social, safe, and participatory web for all, through the development or testing of new digital tools and learning programs;
  • Bridge social and cultural differences by providing youth with opportunities to learn from and with one another in supportive ways;
  • Provide participatory and hands-on making and learning experiences based on the principles of Connected Learning, an educational approach designed to help prepare young people for a world that is highly networked, technology-enabled, and producing new knowledge at a pace not known to previous generations; and
  • Support online programs and applications that enable privacy and diverse and respectful lifestyles and opinions.

The winning programs effectively encourage civic engagement and community-building; promote civility, equity and safety online; embody Connected Learning principles of interest-powered, peer supported and academically oriented learning; and have a strong plan to ensure participation and project success.

The 16 winners are:

  • The Clay Studio’s Claymobile Outreach Claymation Learning Labs;
  • University of Arizona Foundation and The Feminist Wire’s LoveMaps;
  • GlobalGirl Media’s Summer Training Academies;
  • New York Public Radio (WNYC)’s “That Could Be Your Sister” Design Challenge;
  • Colorado State University’s Making Equity;
  • Racquet Up Detroit’s RU Connected;
  • Digital Harbor Foundation’s WebSlam;
  • Filipino American Human Services’ Connected LYFE;
  • Neighborhood Associates Corporation’s Our Community, Our Environment;
  • Catholic Social Services Out of School Time Programs’ Cyber Cadets Summer Workshop;
  • The Jacob Burns Film Center’s Reel Change: Community Vision;
  • Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation’s Connected Messages;
  • Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion’s Digital Media for Social Justice;
  • Appalachian Media Institute’s Digital Citizenship Lab;
  • ThreeSixty Journalism’s Journalism and Communications Lab; and
  • Eyebeam’s Digital Day Camp.

Read more about each project.

From July through September, the winning organizations will host local hands-on events where young people collaborate and compete to build a better web through activities such as hackathons, digital learning labs, maker spaces, badge development workshops, and digital journalism and mentoring workshops. All the events are part of the Summer of Making and Connecting, in which dozens of organizations are engaging young people, parents, teachers and others in creating learning opportunities designed for our times.

Assisting with judging were members of Lady Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation, which partnered with MacArthur’s YOUMedia this past year to create the Born Brave Bus, a national bus tour committed to empowering youth and inspiring bravery in communities across the country.

The Project:Connect Summer Youth Programming Competition and all Digital Media and Learning Competitions are administered by HASTAC through grants from the MacArthur Foundation to the University of California at Irvine.

Since 2004, MacArthur has invested more than $100 million in research, design, and practice to better understand how digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize, and participate in civic life, and what that means for learning and the institutions that support it. More information is at www.macfound.org/education.

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About the MacArthur Foundation

The MacArthur Foundation supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservation and security, make cities better places and understand how technology is affecting children and society.

About the Born This Way Foundation

Led by Lady Gaga and her mother Cynthia Germanotta, the Born This Way Foundation was founded in 2011 to foster a more accepting society, where differences are embraced and individuality is celebrated. The Foundation is dedicated to creating a safe community that helps connect young people with the skills and opportunities they need to build a kinder, braver world.

About HASTAC

HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) is an international network of educators and digital visionaries committed to the creative development and critical understanding of new technologies in life, learning, and society. HASTAC is committed to innovative design, participatory learning, and critical thinking.

 

Press Contact: Sean Harder, MacArthur Foundation, (312) 917-0205, sharder@macfound.org.

Public voting and commenting is now open!

We’re thrilled to have received 266 applications to the Project:Connect Summer Youth Programming Competition and equally excited about the diversity represented within those applications–both in geographic representation (41 states and the District of Columbia), as well as in the range of content, and intended audiences these prospective programs might serve.

Public voting and commenting is now open and will run through June 15th at 5pm PST, so take a few minutes to check out the applications and vote to let us know which project(s) you think should be funded.

To see where the applicants came from, consult the infographic below. Stay tuned to learn which projects will be awarded up to $10,000 for their summer youth program — or follow @dmlcomp or @HASTAC on Twitter.

Please note that voters will be limited to one vote per proposal, but may vote for more than one proposal. Public votes and comments are meant to provide a general indication of public interest in any given proposal, and will be taken into consideration by the judging panel during the formal private judging process. Public votes and comments will not guarantee that a project will or will not be awarded. No special award will be given to the project that amasses the most public votes.

syp-applications-by-state_large

Hacking for a Better Web Winners Announced

After a long, fun day of hacking in New York City yesterday the Project:Connect – Hacking for a Better Web winners were announced:

Social Good

1st place: Helpster by CB Media

2nd place: DoGood.org by Team Hummos

3rd place: Cyberstoop by The Truth

 

Enable Literacy

1st place: Congregate by Arganot

2nd place: Storytellers.com by Backpackers

 

Control of Information

1st place: That Could be your Sister

2nd place: Digital Milestones by Keystone Hacktivist

 

Congratulations to all the participants!

Project:Connect – Summer Youth Programming Competition

 PROJECT:CONNECT - Summer Youth Programming

syp-iconDeadline: Online applications are due June 10, 2013, at 5pm PST. How to apply.

Timeline: Project:Connect-Youth Summer Programs will be held July-September, 2013. Full timeline.

Awards: Up to $10,000 per institution (winners to be announced in early July)

Who is eligible to apply: U.S.-based non-profit learning development and civic engagement institutions and organizations (including learning development organizations such as museums, libraries, after school and summer programs). Additional eligibility requirements.

What: The Project:Connect-Summer Youth Programming Competition supports single or multi-day participatory and hands-on learning experiences (labs, hackathons, pop-up events) to be held at U.S.-based organizations from July-September, 2013. Workshops or hackathons will support youth working with peers, mentors, and educators on learning and creating experiences toward a better web for all. Based on the principles of Connected Learning—learning that is equitable, social, and participatory—Project:Connect Summer Youth Programs will give young people hands-on experience creating, testing, and investigating ways to make using the web a better place to learn, connect, make, contribute, and share.

Winning proposals will create:

  • Social Tools for Social Good – Enabling people to create a culture of kindness, respect, and safety that enhances civic participation for youth.
  • Social Tools that Enable Control of Information – Helping youth understand how to control their information, and manage privacy and security.
  • Social Tools that Enable Literacy – Helping youth build, access, and understand the web in ways that support interest-driven learning, and empower learners to connect in safe ways with resources, mentors, and peers.

Program participants may design or create:

  • Social apps – Create apps, including mobile apps, that promote and enable civic engagement with peers, community building, and kindness to others.
  • Badging programs – Create apps, including mobile apps, that leverage badging and other recognition and feedback methods to inspire youth to develop civic engagement with peers and community building in connected, cooperative, collaborative, safe, and respectful ways.
  • Learning content – Create learning content, curricula, media promotions, and other approaches about how to foster a more engaged, egalitarian, safe, and sharing internet.

Project:Connect Summer Youth Programs may include:

  • Hackathons, that involve youth in connection with mentoring developers and educators in designing, prototyping, and/or coding software; or developing learning programs that promote a better web for learning through connecting and connecting through learning.
  • Digital learning labs, that provide hands-on experience using digital tools for connecting safely, collaborating purposefully, and communicating effectively via the web.
  • Testing labs, that involve young people in evaluating software and online learning programs that promote good web citizenship, or a better web for learning and sharing.
  • Mentoring or leadership workshops, that identify potential peer instructors and mentors, and provide them with opportunities to learn how to support and mentor others effectively and respectfully in web-based connected learning programs and applications.
  • Journalism and communications labs, where young people – acting as reporters, bloggers, and podcasters – participate in the creation of public media that engages questions of equity, good citizenship, privacy, collaboration, and sharing on the web.
  • Badge development workshops, that provide youth with the tools to develop badges for recognizing and rewarding effective digital citizenship, promoting privacy, effective web participation, and connected learning opportunities.

Judging Criteria

Project:Connect-Summer Youth Programming Competition proposals will be evaluated for their potential -

  • to actively contribute to the the goal of a more equitable, social, safe, and participatory web for all, through the development or testing of new digital tools and learning programs;
  • to bridge social and cultural differences by providing youth with opportunities to learn from and with one another in supportive ways;
  • to provide participatory and hands-on making and learning experiences based on the principles of Connected Learning; and
  • to support online programs and applications that support privacy and diverse and respectful lifestyles and opinions.

Networking

Awardees will be invited to attend joint online webinars in preparation for their awarded events. Webinars will discuss mentoring for the respective programming, post-event activities around the program themes for youth participants, and ongoing web networking for youth participants to make, test, and apply apps concerned with promoting effective digital citizenship, safety, and privacy (with parental/guardian input) for awarded and non-awarded participants alike.

All awarded programs will be considered part of and networked with the Summer of Making and Connecting programs.

Public Outreach

All participating institutions will be asked to document the event and its outcomes in a public way. While organizations and individuals retain creative rights for work created in or for the program, participants will also be encouraged to document and share learning materials, media, and digital tools developed at “Project:Connect” events. The material will be displayed on the Family Online Safety Institute’s website A Platform for Good.

Participating organizations may be also asked to contribute to public outreach for MacArthur’s broader Project:Connect campaign, in support of creating a more equitable, social, and participatory web.

Born Brave Bus

The Born This Way Foundation supports the Born Brave Bus enabling creative programming for youth to promote learning together through play, to build a kinder, braver, and safer web world, and to share stories by youth of their approaches to making for dynamic connected learning environments and a safer, braver web world.

The Born Brave Bus will be available to travel to sites of some of the awarded proposals in the Project:Connect-Summer Youth Programming Competition, to supplement proposed activities supported by a Competition award. The Born Brave Bus is designed to engage each visitor up to 30 minutes with interactive experiences encouraging kindness and safety by and for youth in their connected worlds.

If you are interested in the Born Brave Bus being part of your proposed summer Project:Connect-Summer Youth Program activities, you will have an opportunity in your online application to convey this.

Learn more and apply!

Facebook, HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, and the Family Online Safety Institute Launch Project:Connect

project_connect5

MENLO PARK, Calif. — Facebook, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, and the Family Online Safety Institute (FOSI) today announced a series of activities to advance healthy online experiences so young people can more easily make smart and responsible choices on the Internet. 

Under the banner Project:Connect, the four partners will launch an all-day “hackathon” in New York City on Thursday, May 9. The event will bring together programmers, designers, and educators to develop prototypes for social tools, including apps, badges, and curriculum in pursuit of a better Web.

“Supporting healthy online communities is a top priority for MacArthur,” said Connie Yowell, Director of Education at the MacArthur Foundation. “Research shows us that the Internet has become a place where young people are learning and growing. The online world is rapidly becoming a hub for civic activity and lifelong learning, and we need to give youth the tools they need to become engaged and responsible digital citizens.”

Surfacing Innovative Ideas – The Project:Connect Hackathon

Borne out of a shared belief that technology can advance a dialogue about what it means to participate responsibly in a digital world, Project:Connect’s May 9 hackathon will award prizes in the following areas:

  • Social Tools for Social Good – Enabling people to create a culture of kindness and respect that enhances civic participation.
  • Social Tools that Enable Control of Information – Helping people understand how to control their information, and manage privacy and security.
  • Social Tools that Enable Literacy – Helping people build, access, and understand or make components of the Web.

Top concepts, as identified by a panel of expert judges, will be awarded cash prizes.

”We’re thrilled to partner with the MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, and FOSI to promote innovative solutions that can help parents, teachers and teens connect and share safely and do good online,” said Marne Levine, Vice President for Global Public Policy at Facebook. By encouraging digital literacy and responsible online behavior, we can enable teens to use technology as a vehicle for opportunity, learning, and social change.”

Continuing Momentum For Youth During The Summer

The May 9 hackathon will be followed by a series of events at museums and libraries around the country for youth and their families to learn new skills related to digital literacy and civic engagement.

“The beauty of the Web is that when you want to make it better, you don’t have to sit back and wait for someone to fix it for you,” said Mark Surman, Executive Director of Mozilla. “You can build it yourself. We’re thrilled to come together with such great partners to help people make the Web what they want it to be.”

A Platform for Good

In addition to monetary awards, winners of the May 9 hackathon will have their social tools featured on FOSI’s A Platform for Good (aplatformforgood.org), a site dedicated to helping parents, teachers, and students connect, share and do good. A Platform for Good is supported by MacArthur and leaders across several industries, including social media, telecommunications, software and the Internet.

“This hackathon is a great way to highlight the best new thinking around digital citizenship and we are excited to host some of the winners on ‘A Platform for Good’,” said Stephen Balkam, CEO of the Family Online Safety Institute. “Events like this allow for collaboration on some of today’s biggest challenges and show how technology can be used to do great things.”

For more information about Project:Connect, please visit http://dmlcompetition.net/project-connect.

About Facebook

Founded in 2004, Facebook’s mission is to make the world more open and connected. People use Facebook to stay connected with friends and family, to discover what’s going on in the world, and to share and express what matters to them. To find out more about Facebook, visit our website at www.facebook.com.

About The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

The MacArthur Foundation supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservation and security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society. Since 2004, MacArthur has invested more than $100 million in research, design, and practice to better understand how digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize and participate in civic life, and what that means for learning and the institutions that support it.  More information: www.macfound.org/reimagine.

About HASTAC

HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) is an international network of educators and digital visionaries committed to the creative development and critical understanding of new technologies in life, learning, and society. HASTAC is committed to innovative design, participatory learning, and critical thinking.

About Mozilla

Mozilla is a global non-profit that promotes openness, innovation and opportunity on the Web. It strives to make the Web a force for good, while encouraging the users of the Web to also become makers of the Web.


About the Family Online Safety Institute

The Family Online Safety Institute is an international, non-profit organization that works to make the online world safer for kids and their families. FOSI convenes leaders in industry, government and the non-profit sectors to collaborate and innovate new solutions and policies in the field of online safety. Through research, resources, events and special projects, FOSI promotes a culture of responsibility online and encourages a sense of digital citizenship for all.


NOTICE: Space is limited. Please email dml@hri.uci.edu to request an invitation and registration link.