What Do I Need to Know About Designing a Badge System Model?

December 20, 2011

Informational Webinar: Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition
What: Stage Two Prep: Badge Systems Models & Design
Who Should Attend: Potential Stage Two applicants
Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012
When: 1pm EST / 10am PST
Duration: 60 minutes
Register here: https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/534182006

The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation’s Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, launched in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, focuses on badges as a means to inspire learning, confirm accomplishment, or validate the acquisition of knowledge or skills.

During this live webinar for prospective Stage Two badge design applicants, Erin Knight of Mozilla Foundation’s Open Badges project will delve deeper into the badge conversation and explore badge system design and development considerations. Webinar hosts will review different models of existing badge systems and discuss general guidelines and best practices.

Advanced registration recommended, but not required. The webinar will open at 12:45 PM EST to allow registrants time to establish access to the webinar.

Questions can be submitted in advance by emailing dml@hri.uci.edu with “webinar question” in the subject line.


Stage Two (Design & Tech) Webinar: Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition | December 15, 2011 @ 1pm EST

December 14, 2011

The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation’s Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, launched in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, focuses on badges as a means to inspire learning, confirm accomplishment, or validate the acquisition of knowledge or skills.

During this live webinar for prospective Stage Two badge design applicants, we will delve deeper into the badge conversation and explore badge system design and development considerations. We will review different models of existing badge systems and discuss general guidelines and best practices. We will also walk prospective applicants through content, technological and team characteristics that should be considered when developing a badge system and putting together a proposal for Stage Two.

To learn more about the Badges Competition and the Research Competition, visit http://dmlcompetition.net.

Time: 1pm EST / 10am PST
Duration: 60 minutes
Location: https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/953618150

Advanced registration recommended, but not required. Webinar will open at 2:45 PM EST to allow registrants time to establish access to the webinar.

Questions can be submitted in advance by emailing dml@hri.uci.edu and including “webinar question” in the subject line.


Stage Two of the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition Now Accepting Applications

December 9, 2011

The 4th HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition will begin accepting Stage Two applications from organizations, teams, or individuals skilled in designing digital badge systems for Stage One winners’ and official Competition collaborators learning content. Submissions for Stage Two are due no later than January 17, 2012 at 8pm EST / 5pm PST.
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BADGES FOR LIFELONG LEARNING COMPETITION

Badges Competition (three stages)

Awards: $10,000 to $200,000

This year’s Competition, held in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, is designed to encourage the creation of digital badges and badge systems that support, identify, recognize, measure, and account for new skills, competencies, knowledge, and achievements for 21st century learners wherever and whenever learning takes place. There are three stages: Stage Two finalists will be matched with finalists from Stage One, ultimately forming a collaborative Stage Three team. It is this collaborative Stage Three proposal that is subject to award. Institutional/organizational applicants from outside of the United States are welcome to apply.

View the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition timeline here.

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STAGE TWO: BADGE DESIGN AND TECH
Call for badge design, technology, and assessment

Opening: December 12, 2011
Deadline: January 17, 2012 at 5pm PST/ 8pm PST
View the complete Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition Stage Two call for proposals here.
Additional information about the Mozilla Foundation’s Open Badges infrastructure available here.
Informational Webinar on Badge Systems Design and Models with Q&A: Thursday, December 15, 2011 @ 1pm EST. Register for the webinar here.

Stage Two (design and technology stage) seeks organizations, teams, or individuals skilled in the design of badge systems and implementation of badge technology to submit early prototypes for badging systems based on the learning content or programs developed by winning applicants from Stage One and official Competition collaborators.**

Application requirements:
Applications should propose full badge systems and will include badges or sets of badges, assessments, and the technology required to issue, manage, and track or measure performance. Visual materials that graphically represent the proposed badge system, as well as a 1,500 word written description of how the badge system will perform. Stage Two design and tech applicants should describe the badge system they want to build, referring to and describing the characteristics listed here in their written proposal. Applications are due no later than January 17, 2012 at 5pm PST/8pm PST.

Mozilla’s Open Badge Infrastructure makes it easy to issue, display, and manage badges, and as such platforms proposed by Stage Two applicants must work within the Open Badge Infrastructure standards and APIs (http://openbadges.org). Applicants are also encouraged to develop software and widgets that extend the Open Badge Infrastructure. Full information about Mozilla’s OBI, including a beta release, supporting documentation, etc. can be accessed at http://openbadges.org.

Submissions will be displayed online for public comment and assessed by an expert panel of judges before winners are matched with content and programs teams from Stage One.

Who should apply: Organizations, teams, or individuals skilled in design that are interested in submitting an early prototype for badge systems. These applicants will focus their designs on the content and programs proposed by either winning Stage One applicants or Digital Media and Learning Competition Collaborators (including Intel, Microsoft, NASA, Department of Education, American Library Association, Department of Labor, Department of Veteran Affairs, and more)**.

**(NOTE: Badge design and tech applicants that do not use approved content or programs from Stage One or collaborators’ content can still submit their design proposals at this stage, using any content to demonstrate their proposed badge systems. Keep in mind, however, that any successful Stage Two proposals will be matched with winning content from Stage One or collaborator content for collaborating in Stage Three.

Connect with the Digital Media and Learning Competition:

HASTAC Badges Group
Badges for Lifelong Learning on Scoop.it
Twitter: @dmlcomp
Twitter Hashtags: #dmlbadges and #openbadges
DMLComp on Facebook
DML Comp on Google+
DML Comp on LinkedIn
DMLCompNews listserv: Subscribe by sending an email to dmlcompnews-request@duke.edu with “subscribe” in the subject line.


Stage One Winners Advance to Next Stage of Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition

December 7, 2011

December 5, 2011—The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition today announced the 60 winners of Stage One of the Competition. For the list of winners, see www.dmlcompetition.net.  The Competition is held in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, and is part of the 4th Digital Media and Learning Competition funded by the MacArthur Foundation and administered by HASTAC.  The Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition is designed to encourage the creation of digital badges and badge systems that support, identify, recognize, measure, and account for new skills, competencies, knowledge, and achievements for 21st century learners wherever and whenever learning takes place.

Stage One applicants were asked to submit ideas for compelling learning content, activities, or programs for which a badge or set of badges would be useful for recognizing learning that takes place in a particular area or topic. Winning applications represent a wide array of public and private institutions and organizations from around the world, including museums, non-profits, after-school programs, research institutions and for-profit companies. Proposed content for badge systems address a breadth of topics—from the promotion of civic engagement and community volunteerism, to STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) learning in and out of the classroom, to digital literacy, to workforce preparedness and beyond. Winning applications are available for public perusal and commenting at www.dmlcompetition.net.

Based on response in Stage Two, winners of Stage One may be paired with winning badge design/technology teams for the opportunity to work collaboratively on developing a badge system to be judged in Stage Three. Stage Two, which seeks badge system design and tech proposals that respond to Stage One winning content or content from one of the Competition’s official Collaborators—including the Department of Education, the Department of Veteran Affairs, Microsoft, Intel, NASA, the American Library Association and more–opens on December 12, 2011. Full information can be found at www.dmlcompetition.net.

Stage One Winners:

Jodi Asbell-Clarke, TERC, Canada
The Arcadia Badge Program: Measuring High-School Science Through Games
Steven Atneosen, DebateHall, United States
DebateHall DML Competition
Michelle Aubrecht, Ohio State University, United States
Meet the Earthworks Builders
Michelle Baldwin, Hands on Atlanta, United States
Hands on Atlanta Volunteer Service Badge Program
Jennifer Schwarz Ballard, Chicago Botanic Garden, United States
Chicago for Youth Excellence in the Sciences (Chicago YES)
John Bell, ICD, University of Maine, United States
Innovative Communication Design Badges
Jesse Blom, Sweet Water Foundation Inc., United States
Sweet Water Aquapons (AQUAPONS)
Michael Braithwaite, Providence After School Alliance (PASA), United States
Pathways for Lifelong Learning
Rebecca Bray, Smithsonian Institution – NMNH, United States
Smithsonian Natural History Badges
Kaye Buchman, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, United States
Design Mind · 2Design
Michael Capobianco, MOUSE Inc., United States
MOUSE Wins! Badge-based Achievement System for National Youth Technology Leadership
Jeanne Century, Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, Physical Sciences Division, University of Chicago, United States
OurPlayground: Come Play With the World
Tara Chklovski, Iridescent, United States
The Curiosity Machine
Jean-Philippe Choinière, Scolab, Canada
BuzzMath
Ruth Cohen, American Museum of Natural History, United States
American Museum of Natural History: Badges for Science Literacy and Identity
Bill Dahl, PlantingScience/Botanical Society of America, United States
PlantingScience 
DigitalMe, DigitalMe, Great Britain
S2R Badges
Angela Elkordy, Eastern Michigan University, United States
Lifelens
Lucy Erickson, Chimp-n-Sea Wildlife Conservation Fund, Great Britain
Virtual Ecotourism
Michael Furdyk, TakingITGlobal, Canada
David Gagnon, ARIS Project – University of Wisconsin – Madison, United States
Stephen Gilman, Center for Creative Education, United States
Steve Goldenberg, Interfolio Inc., United States
Laura Gordon, WNET, United States
Kelly Gorman, Smithsonian Institution, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, United States
Diana Graber, CyberWise, United States
Tene’ Gray, Digital Youth Network, United States
Ian Guest, Sheffield High School, Great Britain
Susan Harris, University of Southern California Joint Educational Project, United States
Ross Higashi, Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy, United States
Jude Higdon, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, United States
Marisa Jahn, People’s Production House, United States
Dolly Joseph, Computers4Kids, United States
Edward Keller, Parsons The New School For Design, School of Design Strategies, United States
Gene Koo, iCivics, Inc., United States
Denise LaBuda, Economic Independence Group, LLC, United States
Joey J. Lee, Teachers College, Columbia University, United States
Peter Levine, Tisch College, Tufts University, United States
Daniel Rees Lewis, Design for America, United States
Jeremy Liu, East Bay Asian Local Development Corporation, United States
Laurina Isabella Lyle, Project WET Foundation, United States
Bruce Mason, American Association of Physics Teachers, United States
Stephanie Norby, Smithsonian Center for Education & Museum Studies, United States
Joanna Normoyle, Agricultural Sustainability Institute at University of California, Davis, United States
Susi Owusu, 10:10, Great Britain
Brett Pierce, Steel River Productions, Inc., United States
Arun Prabhakaran, Urban Affairs Coalition, United States
Katie Rast, Fab Lab, United States
Justine Richardson, MATRIX/Michigan State University, United States
Jon Rosewell, The Open University, Great Britain
Richard Scullin, MobileEd.org, United States
Eric Schwarz, Citizen Schools, United States
Deborah Sliter, National Environmental Education Foundation, United States
Jennifer Sly, Minnesota Historical Society, United States
Lonny Stern, STEM Council at Skillpoint Alliance, United States
Spencer Striker, University of Wisconsin at Whitewater, United States
Lora Taub-Pervizpour, Muhlenberg College, United States
Nancy Trautmann, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, United States
Maya Wiseman, Bottled City Project, Germany
Christopher Wisniewski, Museum of the Moving Image, United States

Enter Stage One of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition: Applications Due Today

December 5, 2011

How many words does it take to describe your learning content? Applications for Stage One of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition require a 1000-word written proposal (plus optional additional material if you need). The clock is ticking for today’s deadline (8pm EST/5pm PST), but there’s still time to apply.

Take a look at the call for proposals below to see if your organization has material to be a Stage One contender. Need some ideas to get you going? Check our Badges Competition page to see the kind of learning content proposed by other organizations, or  browse our Collaborators’ content to see what they posted. In conjunction with the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, applicants are invited to propose badging systems not only for learning content, but also for teacher learning and feedback. Competitive submissions proposing badge systems that track and promote feedback regarding the competencies and skills as well as the programs and subjects over which teachers acquire expertise will be a central part of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes of the Competition. The winning proposal(s) will be awarded funding to develop the proposed badging system.

Stage 1: Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition

At Stage 1, educators applying to the Competition submit proposals describing subject and content matter for a teacher badge system that recognizes, rewards and offers peer feedback to teachers regarding mastery of capacities and skills. Submissions require a 1000 word written proposal and can include optional supplementary materials that help visualize the proposed badging system. These materials should include systems for recognizing and rewarding some of the capacities, skills and content they believe are needed to effectively teach math, literacy, or digital literacy skills and/or to effectively teach to the Common Core State Standards. For example, giving feedback to students; developing complex skills; or skills needed to teach in an environment that privileges digital or online learning. Deadline for Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition Stage 1: December 5, 2011, 5pm PST/8pm EST.


Second webinar on badge system models and design considerations

December 1, 2011

Yesterday we held our second webinar of phase 2, “Badge System Models and Design.” It featured a great presentation by Carla Cassilli of Mozilla about the many considerations of designing an effective digital badge system. You can watch the video below, or at http://youtu.be/zCAy5weZyHc, and you can download the slides directly as a PDF right here.


What If Teachers Decided (for Themselves!) What Counts?

November 17, 2011

By Cathy Davidson

We at HASTAC are extremely proud to announce the opening of a new Competition, designed specifically for educators, “Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition.”  The purpose is to support educators in their own professional goals, in their desire to develop their skills and knowledge, and in their own professionalism in judging quality—not being judged, top down.  This Competition begins from the premise that great teachers should be acknowledged and, equally, that great teachers work hard to get that way and should be appreciated as such.   Who better to know how to do this than educators themselves?  This Competition invites educators to think about the most creative, interactive, interesting ways of deciding what counts most for great teaching—and how to count it.

My personal investment in this Competition is in that it is based on supporting an ideal of professionalism to one of the great professions that, in recent years, has been something of a whipping boy to many.   Face it, it’s not easy being an educator these days.  It’s not just the de-funding of schools, not just the requirements for end-of-grade testing that may or may not have much relationship to actual knowledge, it’s not just that much of our thinking about what education is for is antiquated and hasn’t been re-thought, top to bottom, for the information and communication revolution that began in April of 1993 when the Mosaic 1.0 browser went public and the Information Age officially began.   No,  it is hard to be an educator these days because teachers have been subjected to some pretty “regulatory” measures lately.

Sometimes these come from higher up, being initiated by politicians rather than educators themselves.   The language is of “certification” and “accreditation” but too often it is not clear if it is real quality that is being measured or something far more bureaucratic, that has little to do with a teacher’s ability to inspire students or to keep up with the changing knowledge in a field.  Too often, these “merit” systems  don’t really measure merit but, instead, undermine teachers’ own sense of professionalism, as if teachers aren’t the ones most concerned with our own high standards (the best ones of us are!).

I’m convinced a lot of the mentality of policing and regulating teachers is contributing to the national crisis of many of the best teachers leaving the profession.   According to the National Education Association, about half of new teachers do not stay in teaching.  In a U.S. Department of Education survey of 7,000 teachers  who had recently quit or said they were likely to quit soon, the #1 reason given was intrusive administration; another was cumbersome and ineffective  accountability procedures.  And some of the other top five reasons were also about this externalizing of  the “metrics” for excellence over the inspiring, creative, intelligent, and powerful ways that motivate kids to learn—and motivate teachers to stay in the classroom, despite the low pay and hard work.

The reason I wrote the “How We Measure” chapter of Now You See It is because all my research, including interviews with dozens of great teachers, underscores that we now have ways of measuring “quality” that are neither about quality, nor even about good ways of measuring.

  • If a multiple choice, end-of-grade test only covers about 25% of the actual content/material in a course, what about all the rest?
  • If we know that you have to “teach to the test” to ensure your students get the best test scores,  what  happens to the ideal of teaching to improve students’ real skills and knowledge (not just test-taking ability that has little real-world relevance)?
  • If we know the biggest motivator to testing well is believing high scores will help get one to college, then what about all the kids who know they will never be able to afford higher education?

All that wasted effort!   All those ways of measuring qualities peripheral to the ones great teachers know are needed to inspire kids.  It’s a tragedy, and it is sending our best teachers out of the profession fast.

Will this one Badges for Teacher Mastery and Feedback Competition solve all problems?  Of course not.  But we are extremely proud, at HASTAC, to announce the opening of a new Competition designed specifically for educators, that puts educators in a leadership role, helping to think about cutting-edge new ways of assessing what they know to be high quality,  important new skills and areas of knowledge.

This isn’t for everybody and shouldn’t be.  We are trying not  to go for one-size-fits-all which we think of as the kind of standardization that de-motivates true learning.   Rather, we invite any educator who is passionate about these issues to compete, to show their ideas on our all-public website, and to inspire others to think deeply, too, about what counts in the classroom, what should be counted, why, and how.

We assume most applicants will be K-12 educators, but we want any teacher, from preschool to professional school, informal and formal learning, who is deeply interested in thinking about new peer feedback and mastery badging systems to apply.  We know that we all have much to learn from one another.

To those educators interested in these issues, we invite you to apply and we thank you for your dedication and your commitment to what, at HASTAC, is our motto:  learning the future together.

Here’s the link to the Competition application page:  http://dmlcompetition.net/Competition/4/teachers.php

Applications due December 5, 2011.


JUST ANNOUNCED: Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition

November 17, 2011

In conjunction with the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, applicants are invited to propose badging systems not only for learning content, but also for teacher learning and feedback. Competitive submissions proposing badge systems that track and promote feedback regarding the competencies and skills as well as the programs and subjects over which teachers acquire expertise will be a central part of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes of the Competition. The winning proposal(s) will be awarded funding to develop the proposed badging system.

Learn more at http://www.dmlcompetition.net/Competition/4/teachers.php


Second webinar on Badge System Models and Design will be Nov. 30

November 17, 2011

The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation’s Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, launched in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, focuses on badges as a means to inspire learning, confirm accomplishment, or validate the acquisition of knowledge or skills.

During this live webinar for prospective Stage Two badge design applicants, we will delve deeper into the badge conversation and explore badge system design and development considerations. We will review different models of existing badge systems and discuss general guidelines and best practices. We will also walk prospective applicants through content, technological and team characteristics that should be considered when developing a badge system and putting together a proposal for Stage 2.

To learn more about the Badges Competition and the Research Competition, visit http://dmlcompetition.net.

Badges for Lifelong Learning Webinar: Stage Two Prep | Badge Systems Models and Design takes place Wednesday, November 30, 2011 at 3pm EST / 12pm PST
  • Time: 3pm EST / 12pm PST
  • Duration: 60 minutes
  • Location: https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/741026966
    Advanced registration recommended, but not required. Webinar will open at 2:45 PM EST to allow registrants time to establish access to the webinar.

Questions can be submitted in advance by emailing dml@hri.uci.edu and including “webinar question” in the subject line.

 


Video from our first Badge Design webinar

November 17, 2011

Yesterday we held our first webinar of phase 2, “Badge System Models and Design.” It features a great presentation by Erin Knight of Mozilla about the many considerations of designing an effective digital badge system. You can watch the video below, or at http://youtu.be/1Zrirng0_ls, and you can download the slides directly as a PDF right here.