Researchers Introduce New Model of Learning

March 1, 2012

Connected Learning: Designed to ‘mine the new social, digital domain’

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. — Citing an ever-widening gap between in-school and out-of-school learning experiences, a team of researchers today introduced a model of learning — ‘connected learning’ — that taps into the rich new world of information, knowledge, and online collaboration available to youth and learners.

The connected learning model, which is anchored in a large body of research on how youth are using social media, the internet and digital media to learn and develop expertise, also seeks to respond to deepening fears of a class-based “equity” gap in education that, without intervention, is likely to be accelerated by disproportionate access to technology and new forms of knowledge sharing.

“We are seeing a growing gap between in-school and out-of-school learning as more and more of young people’s learning, attention, and access to information is happening outside of classrooms and through online networks and exchanges,” said Mimi Ito, a cultural anthropologist at the University of California, Irvine, who specializes in youth and technology. She is one of the principal investigators in the new Connected Learning Research Network, funded by the MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning Initiative. “That’s the disturbing news,” Ito said. “The good news is that new technology also hands us opportunities for bringing young people, educators, and parents together in cross-generational learning driven by shared interests and goals.”

Connected learning, Ito said, suggests an approach to education that integrates and connects learning across different settings in a young person’s life because learners achieve best when their learning is reinforced and supported in multiple settings, by parents, educators, knowledgeable peers, and communities that center on their interests. Ito said even more research on learning is needed as the ability to span school, home, community, and peer interaction grows.

Researchers pointed out that, as a new model, connected learning will benefit immensely from contributions and critique from the many stakeholders in public education, especially in how to translate its principles into practice. It draws on social, ubiquitous, blended and personalized learning models, designers and practitioners working with the effort say, but is distinctive and has the potential to help reconstitute our educational system.

The introduction of the connected learning model took place at an evening press briefing at a conference in San Francisco attended by 1,000 technologists, futurists, researchers and educators, “Beyond Educational Technology: Learning Innovations in a Connected World.”

A set of principles for connected learning were developed by a group of researchers, technology makers, philanthropists, and educational practitioners seeking to come together around a common approach for how to expand educational opportunity in the digital age. This approach proposes knitting together of three crucial contexts for learning:

Interest-powered…Research has repeatedly shown that when a subject is personally interesting and relevant, learners achieve much higher-order learning outcomes.

Peer-supported…In their everyday exchanges with peers and friends, young people are fluidly contributing, sharing and giving feedback in web-powered experiences that are highly engaging.

Academically oriented…When academic studies and institutions draw from and connect to young people’s interest-driven pursuits, learners flourish and realize their true potential.

…and the embrace of three key design principles:

Production-centered…Connected learning prioritizes the learning that comes from actively producing, creating, experimenting and designing, because it promotes skills and dispositions for lifelong learning, and for making meaningful contributions to today’s rapidly changing work- and social conditions.

Open networks…Today’s online platforms and digital tools can make learning resources abundant, accessible, and visible across all learner settings.

Shared purpose…Today’s social media and web-based communities provide unprecedented opportunities for cross-generational and cross-cultural learning and connection to unfold and thrive around common goals and interests.

The connected learning model seeks to take advantage of the web’s radically expanding culture of sharing by developing learning experiences for all youth that are more engaging, more motivating, more social, and more supported, because they are abetted by the internet and today’s dynamic knowledge society.

Researchers also announced the launch of two new websites, connectedlearning.tv and clrn.dmlhub.net, featuring an array of resources and research, all open and free:

  • Weekly webinars for educators, researchers, policymakers, youth workers, and parents about this new approach to learning
  • Stories of connected learners, and educators and organizations already deploying connected learning principles
  • Videos about connected learning and the research behind it
  • An infographic, an executive summary, and detailed white paper that researchers hope will activate conversation and collaboration among education reformers
  • Details of a second wave of ongoing research by a group of education/technology/media scholars from the U.S. and the UK who comprise the Connected Learning Research Network

“I don’t think there’s anyone in education and learning who doesn’t feel an urgent need to reimagine learning for the new century,” said Connie Yowell, Director of Education for U.S. programs for the MacArthur Foundation. The connected learning model, research, and work is supported by the MacArthur Foundation as part of its Digital Media & Learning Initiative, a nearly $100 million program that was one of the first philanthropic efforts in the U.S. to systematically explore the impact of digital media on young people and implications for the future of learning. “Our schools are struggling to prepare young people for fulfilling adult lives and careers.

“Connected learning represents a path forward,” Yowell said. “It’s learning that is socially rich and interest-fueled — in other words, it’s based on the kind of learning that decades of research shows is the most powerful, most effective. And connected learning is oriented towards cultivating educational and economic opportunity for all young people.”

Among the topics at the heart of a new tide of ongoing research by the Connected Learning Research Network:

How can our new culture of online sharing and connecting improve mentoring and coaching for youth, both with peers and multi-generationally?

How specifically is social networking changing the learning practices of youth?

How effective can the exploding sector of open learning and peer-to-peer learning be?

In what ways can digital media boost learning for marginalized communities?

What can popular strategy and creation-oriented games such as LittleBigPlanet 2 and Starcraft II teach us about the power of new-generation video games for learning and education?

Can social media and digital technology improve the impact of after-school programs, especially for disadvantaged youth?

Does learning that is connected to a learner’s interest help produce young people who are more civically engaged and more active 21st century citizens?

The researchers are:

Kris Gutierrez, professor of literacy and learning sciences who is an expert in learning and new media literacies and designing transformative learning environments, University of Colorado, Boulder

Mimi Ito, Research Network Chair, a cultural anthropologist with deep expertise in the implications of how youth are engaging with technology and digital media who led benchmark three-year study of digital youth, University of California, Irvine

Sonia Livingstone, a leading expert on children, youth, and the internet, including issues of risk and safety, and author of a massive study of 25,000 European children and their parents on internet usage, London School of Economics and Political Science

Bill Penuel, expert in learning with digital media in both formal and informal settings, literacy, and using digital tools for digital storytelling, University of Colorado, Boulder

Jean Rhodes, clinical psychologist with expertise in mentoring, adolescent development, and the role of intergenerational relationships in digital media and learning, University of Massachusetts, Boston

Katie Salen, a game designer who has founded two 6th-12th grade public schools that employ game principles for learning, Depaul University

Juliet Schor, economist and sociologist who has published broadly on work, family and sustainability, Boston College

S. Craig Watkins, expert on young people’s social and digital media behaviors and is piloting new programs for in-school and out-of-school learning, University of Texas, Austin

“The announcement of the connected learning principles and the research of the connected learning network couldn’t come at a more crucial time,” said David Theo Goldberg, director of the University of California systemwide Humanities Research Institute and executive director of the Digital Media & Learning Research Hub, sponsor of the connected learning work. “The connected learning principles are well-suited to our digital society. They are built on the best of a historical body of research on how youth learn, combined with fresh research that has surfaced the extraordinary learning opportunities made available through today’s networked and digital media.

“The Connected Learning initiative is also a call for those of us working at the intersection of technology, learning and youth to join together in communities to advance creative new forms of learning and to share them widely with all those who stand to benefit.”

About the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub

The work of the DML Research Hub, which includes original research on connected learning, and youth and participatory politics; websites; publications; workshops, and an annual conference, is funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Located physically at the University of California, Irvine, and situated within the UC system’s Humanities Research Institute, the Research Hub is dedicated to analyzing and interpreting the impact of the internet and digital media on education, politics, and youth. The website for the research hub is dmlcentral.net

About the MacArthur Foundation and the Digital Media & Learning Initiative

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conversation and security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society. The MacArthur Foundation launched its digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize and participate in civic life, and what that means for their learning in the 21st century. More information on the digital media and learning initiative is available at www.macfound.org/education.


The Future of Learning in a Connected World: Digital Media & Learning Conference in San Francisco Draws Hundreds of Researchers, Technologists, Educators

February 1, 2012

How must learning and education adapt to digital society? That’s the question hundreds of technologists, futurists, researchers, and educators will take on in the “Beyond Educational Technology: Learning Innovations in a Connected World” conference, Mar. 1-3, in San Francisco.

With provocative talks, inspiring case studies, and panel conversations featuring global thought leaders, scholars, and leading practitioners, the conference will address rapidly-escalating concerns about the urgent need to reimagine education, learning, and school for the present generation and beyond.

At the heart of the conference lies a challenge that is drawing the attention of activists, policymakers and social innovators everywhere: At this historical moment, people, cultures, and knowledge are coming together in unprecedented ways via the internet, digital technology, and social media — how should learners and learning institutions change?

The conference, to be held at the Wyndham Parc 55 Hotel in the Union Square district, will spotlight scores of examples of next-generation learning and innovation, including:

  • The exploding sector of international online social learning networks.
  • How YouTube is being used by youth across the world to teach other specialized subject matter.
  • How a group of Muslim girls is using digital media to tell the world what their lives are like.
  • Youth who are designing and using videogames to explore critical social issues like climate change and human rights.
  • Ways in which social media is being used in local communities to push back on the destructive dynamics of gangs and ethnic rivalries.
  • A school in northern California where teachers let go of the reigns and let youth learn by designing solutions to real-world issues they care about.

The conference will be dedicated to illuminating big-picture questions but also everyday ones, such as: What happens when a group of 15 teenagers from an underprivileged community in Texas are given regular access to computers and the internet? Are skills like multimedia production and credibility assessment just as important now as reading, writing, and arithmetic? Is the use of social media a classroom-essential?

The first day of the conference will feature a special briefing during which researchers will outline a new model of learning especially geared to digital society. Called ‘Connected Learning’, it is a new vision of learning suited to the complexity, connectivity, and velocity of the new knowledge society and today’s economic and political realities. A fresh approach to education, connected learning is anchored in research and the best of traditional standards, but also designed to mine the learning potential of the new social- and digital media domain. The press briefing and reception, including cocktails, will take place Thursday, Mar. 1, from 5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Members of the news media interested in attending the briefing can get more information by emailing Whitney Burke at the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, wburke@hri.uci.edu.

The conference also will feature a Science Fair, produced by the Mozilla Foundation, a nonprofit organization that created the Firefox web browser and advocates worldwide for internet freedom. Mozilla’s science fair will spotlight many exciting new learning-related undertakings, including: Hive Learning Networks, open, connected communities in New York and Chicago dedicated to transforming the learning landscape for youth; Mozilla Popcorn, a classroom tool for youth to produce video book reports, interactive essays, and digital-age storytelling; Peer 2 Peer University, a grassroots open education project that organizes learning outside of institutional walls; and Mozilla Open Badges, an effort to create a new way of recognizing skills and achievements for 21st century learners. The Science Fair will take place Thursday, Mar. 1, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. It’s a casual event and cocktails and snacks will be served.

The opening night of the conference will also see the naming of the 2011 award winners for the MacArthur Foundation-supported fourth annual Digital Media & Learning Competition. Winners will receive awards of up to $200,000. This year’s competition has been designed to encourage individuals and organizations to create new forms of recognition – digital badges that identify, recognize, and account for new skills, competencies, knowledge, and achievements for 21st century learners regardless of where and when learning takes place.

The conference theme, “Beyond Educational Technology: Learning Innovations in a Connected World,” refers to a dramatic shift that has taken place even in the last few years: the realization that a renaissance in learning is not tied to any specific tool or platform or individual technology, but to the impact of the widespread creation and acquisition of knowledge that is now possible through observing, interacting and collaborating with others anywhere, anytime. The headline speakers include John Seely Brown, an expert in radical innovation, digital culture and ubiquitous computing; and conference chair Diana Rhoten, digital learning entrepreneur and senior vice president for strategy in the new education division at News Corp.

Rhoten believes the conference topic, timing, and location (so near Silicon Valley) will be an unusual opportunity for critical, diverse voices to challenge assumptions and status quo thinking about reimagining education in the 21st century — and to take on the compelling if controversial role of digital technology, the internet and social media in that task.

“Technology is just a tool to be put in the hands of the users,” Rhoten says. “So before we start talking about what technology can do to innovate education, we must back up the conversation and really understand what the primary practices and purposes of learning are. There’s no other market in which products are built without significant user input. If we don’t start doing that in this sector, we are failing the teachers, students, and parents who are intended to be the direct beneficiaries of entrepreneurial activity.”

This is the third annual conference produced by the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, which organizes the gathering to explore what next-generation learning looks like in a world being remade by innovation, technology, and social networks. Located physically at the University of California, Irvine, and situated within the UC system’s Humanities Research Institute, the Research Hub is dedicated to analyzing and interpreting the impact of the internet and digital media on education, politics, and youth.

“Bringing together thought leaders, major technology developers, prominent researchers, and innovative practitioners nationally and internationally, this is a ‘must attend’ experience for anyone wanting to figure out where learning practices are headed, leading research in the field, and best practices in technologically-enabled learning,” says David Theo Goldberg, director of the UC Humanities Research Institute and executive director of the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. “The Digital Media and Learning Conference is a key forum for discovering leading thought and developments regarding digital media’s impact on the innovation and transformation of learning and educational practice.”

The work of the DML Research Hub, which includes original research, websites, publications, workshops, and the conference, is funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The Gates Foundation, the Mozilla Foundation, and Microsoft Research have also contributed to this year’s conference.

About the MacArthur Foundation and the Digital Media & Learning Initiative The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservation and security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society. The MacArthur Foundation launched its digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, play, socialize and participate in civic life, and what that means for their learning in the 21st century. More information on the digital media and learning initiative is available at www.macfound.org/education.


REMINDER: Stage Two Applications for the Teacher Mastery & Feedback Badge Competition Due February 3, 2012 @ 5pm PST

February 1, 2012

In conjunction with the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, applicants are invited to propose badging systems not only for learning content, but also for teacher learning and feedback. Competitive submissions proposing badge systems that track and promote feedback regarding the competencies and skills as well as the programs and subjects over which teachers acquire expertise are a central part of the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes of the Competition. The winning proposal(s) will be awarded funding to develop the proposed badging system.

For Stage 2, Teacher Mastery and Feedback applicants are encouraged to submit proposals that map out what a teacher mastery and feedback badging system would look like, how it would operate, what benefits and challenges it would present, and the design and implementation process it would incorporate. The proposed badging systems should be based on, and fully interoperable with, Mozilla’s Open Badge Infrastructure (http://openbadges.org).

Stage Two seeks organizations, teams or individuals skilled in the design of badge systems and implementation of badge technology. Design and tech applicants at this stage should describe the badge system they want to build, referring to and describing Stage Two characteristics listed on this page.

Stage Two seeks fully developed badge systems and will include badges or sets of badges, assessments, and the technology required to issue, manage, and track or measure performance. Badge system design and tech proposals may be based on winning content from Stage One, or may use other content to demonstrate the designs.

Badge design and tech applicants that do not use approved content or programs from Stage One can still submit their design proposals at this stage, using any content to demonstrate their proposed badge systems. But bear in mind, however, that if successful in Stage Two, these proposals will be matched with winning content and programs from Stage One for the final proposals.

Whatever technology you propose, the badges must be compatible with the Mozilla Open Badge Infrastructure (http://openbadges.org). The infrastructure includes a simple metadata standard and a set of APIs to allow learners to gather and display badges from across the web. The intent is to afford learners full control over their own badges once issued, giving them more freedom to use badges how they like and promoting a vibrant badge ecosystem.

Applicants are highly encouraged to develop software and widgets that extend the Open Badge Infrastructure. Software and widgets of high value to many badge issuers may be considered for a stand alone grant that requires a lower level of collaboration at the final stage.

Submission Details

Submissions will require a 1500 word written proposal plus visual materials that graphically represent the badge design submission. These can include a video, a diagram, screenshots, napkin sketch, or other visual expressions. Click here for more information about applying to Stage Two of the Teacher Mastery & Feedback Badge Competition.

 

Deadline for Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition Stage 2: Feburary 3, 2012, 5pm PST/8pm EST.


Webinar video: Designing badge systems for teachers

January 30, 2012

Last week we held a webinar on “Badge System Models and Design” for the DML Badges for Teachers competition featuring a presentation by Carla Cassili on designing an effective digital badge system, and Q &A with David Theo Goldberg.

You can watch the video below,  view it at http://youtu.be/fhDWfeGgrR4, or download the slides directly as a PDF right here.


Designing Badge Systems | Informational Webinar for Stage Two Prep: Thursday, January 26 @ 1pm EST

January 25, 2012

Informational Webinar: Designing Badge Systems for the Teacher Mastery & Feedback Badge Competition
What: Stage Two Prep: Badge Systems Models & Design
Who Should Attend: Potential Stage Two applicants
Date: Thursday, January 26, 2012
When: 1pm EST / 10am PST
Duration: 60 minutes
Register here: https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/181225918

The HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation’s Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, launched in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation, focuses on badges as a means to inspire learning, confirm accomplishment, or validate the acquisition of knowledge or skills.

During this live webinar for prospective Stage Two badge design applicants, Carla Casilli of Mozilla Foundation’s Open Badges project and David Theo Goldberg, Executive Director of the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub, will discuss badge system design and development, and take general questions about the Stage Two application process. Webinar hosts will review different models of existing badge systems and discuss general guidelines and best practices.

Advanced registration is recommended, but not required. The webinar will open at 12:45 PM EST to allow registrants time to establish access to the webinar.

Questions can be submitted in advance by emailing dml@hri.uci.edu with “webinar question” in the subject line.

Participate in real-time on Twitter using #dmlbadges.


How can badges surface the expertise and mastery of our teachers and provide recognition for learning?

January 23, 2012

How can badges surface the expertise and mastery of our teachers, while giving them recognition for their own professional learning and development? Sarah Jackson of Spotlight on DML recently browsed through the first stage of winning proposals for the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Competition, and shared her thoughts about the “concrete and exciting examples of badge systems designed to recognize educators who learn from experts and from each other.” Jackson writes:

“A partnership between KQED and PBS LearningMedia proposes creating a badge system to encourage teachers of students in grades 4-12 to develop media-rich science inquiry projects to help them integrate new media technologies and literacies into their own teaching.Working as part of a cohort, participants would complete a series of activities to help learn to create media and media-centered science lessons plans. The badge system would rely heavily on peer review and require teachers to asses the work of other educators. There are also proposed badge systems for training in historygame based-learning environmentscomputer science, and to help meet the on-the-job training needs of community educators who teach in after-school settings. Educators at Bank Street College of Education have proposed developing an online community of practice for early childhood and special education teachers. Participants can earn ‘Bank Street Badges,’ meant to inspire teachers to bring innovative teaching methods into their own classrooms and schools. Their proposed site would encourage educators to ‘acknowledge their own learning and/or their contributions to the learning of others.’ Teachers on the Bank Street site would be able to create and share documents, case studies and classroom scenarios. Bank Street staff would create rubrics and use existing standards to measure both participation in the online community as well as deep knowledge of early childhood education and teaching effectiveness.”

(To read the rest of the article, visit http://spotlight.macfound.org/blog/entry/teachers-explore-badges-for-mastery-and-feedback/)

Spread the word that Stage Two of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Competition is accepting applications until February 3, 2012 at 5pm PST / 8pm EST. Click here for more information about Stage Two. Have questions? Mark your calendar and join us Thursday, January 26, 2012 at 10am PST / 1pm EST for a webinar about designing badge systems. A registration link to the webinar will be posted on the DMLCompetition.net shortly.


Working on K-12 Badges in Atlanta: A Report from Global Kids

January 22, 2012

By Daria Ng

This week, Global Kids spent a productive day visiting The Epstein Middle School School in Atlanta, where the school has implemented a badging system beginning with their sixth grade. Global Kids, along with staff at Epstein, custom designed a badging system to support the development of independent learning skills amongst the student body, funded by the Covenant Foundation.

The system is based on the recognition that learning in the 21st Century takes place not just in classrooms, but after school and through informal uses of digital media. To develop life-long learning skills, youth need to recognize how they are learning valuable skills across these venues and how to strategically navigate these sites of learning. Badge systems are designed to provide scaffolding, motivation, and recognition.

(Youth who are working on badges at Epstein can receive a power-up to miss certain classes to work on their next badge. They must wear a tag to identify themselves.)

The Epstein Badging System includes a number of elements, including the badges themselves, digital transcripts, a badge management system, a badge submission process, committees, learning rubrics, back-end infrastructure, and digital portfolios.

Yesterday, Barry Joseph and I, along with the school’s Instructional Coordinator, taught one of the sixth grade classes how to use Voicethread, the tool where they will be creating digital portfolios. They learned to create slides, upload and take images, and comment through text and audio. Afterwards, we spent time working with staff on the back end infrastructure to ensure that the badge management system was working properly.

We also had the chance to meet with two groups of students to conduct focus groups. The first group of students had chosen to earn badges, while the second group had not. Much was learned from chatting with the amazingly eloquent students and a full report will be put together with key findings. One of the highlights was that badges were a motivating factor for students in the school who were not generally the “honors” students; earning badges has given this group the opportunity to have their abilities recognized by their community. Many of the youth who chose to earn badges were pursuing interest-driven projects outside of their schoolwork obligations. They were also able to describe the difference between grades and badges as a form of achievement.6727518717_031aff4e47.jpg

For the group of youth who have chosen not to pursue badges, all of them cited that they lacked the time to do so, with competing priorities of extracurricular activities and heavy homework loads. Interestingly enough, for this group, the connection between the activities they were already involved with and the badges they could earn were not entirely clear to them. For example, if they played a team sport, they did not make the connection that they could, in fact, earn the Collaboration badge.

We ended the day with a workshop for the faculty, where Barry gave a “big picture” on badges, including the history of digital badges and the recent Digital Media & Learning: Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition. Teachers asked questions about badges, many of which were around issues of credibility and credentialing, and were excited to be part of such an important and new innovation.

To view the full Flickr set, click here.

(The original post for this article appeared on Global Kids)


Teacher Mastery & Feedback Badge Competition: Stage Two Submissions Due February 3, 2012

January 18, 2012

Please note: Applicants who applied to Stage Two of the Badges for Lifelong Learning may submit proposals for Stage Two of the Teacher Mastery & Feedback Badge Competition. 

Stage Two applicants for the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition are invited to propose badging systems for the teacher learning and feedback content of Stage One winners. Competitive submissions proposing badge systems that track and promote feedback regarding the competencies and skills as well as the programs and subjects over which teachers acquire expertise are a central part of the Stage One and Stage Two processes of the Competition.

Stage Two Badge Design and Tech applications may be submitted to the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition (deadline Feb. 3) through DMLCompetition.net.

Click here to view the 16 Stage One winners from the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badges Competition.

Stage One: Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Content and Programs Winners

Sasha Barab, Center for Impact Games at Arizona State University
Badges for America: Preparing Teachings for the 21st Century

Diane Gal, State University of New York, Empire State College – School for Graduate Studies
Mastery of Open Online Tools for Learning (MOOT4L) Badge Experience

Alex Griswold, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Annenberg Learner Ambassador Badge Program

Richard Ingram, James Madison Partners for Learning
MacArthur Badges for Standards-based ICT Skills for Teachers – United States and Worldwide

Tony Jackson, Asia Society
Pathways to Global Competence: A Badge System for Educators

Cecilia Lenk, The Reynolds Center for Teaching, Learning and Creativity
simSchool BadgeUp: The Digital Badges Approach to Global Teacher Preparation and Accreditation

David Libert, Milwaukee Teacher Education Center
Growing New Pathways to Teacher Certification

Joshua Marks, curriki.org
Curriki Certified Open Educator

Bruce Morrow, Bank Street College of Education
Bank Street Community of Online Practice

MaryFaith Mount-Cors, VIF International Education
Global Gateway: A Global STEM Educator Badging System

Corey Newhouse, Public Profit LLC
California Out-of-School Time Badges Initiative

Leah Potter, American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Who Built America? Badges for Teaching Disciplinary Literacy in History

Rebecca Schultz, KQED
Science Media Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badges

Robin Shoop, Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy
Computer Science Student Network Teacher Badge System

Andrew Stillman, New Visions for Public Schools
YouPD: Rethinking Professional Development for Teachers

Kris Swanson, Poinciana Elementary STEM Magnet School
Elementary STEM Teacher Certification Project


Today is the deadline for Stage Two submissions | Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition

January 17, 2012

Today at 5pm PST / 8pm EST, submissions for Stage Two of the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition are due (not to be confused with the deadline for Stage Two of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition on February 3, 2012).

Those of you who have followed Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition from the day we announced this year’s theme in Washington, DC  know how lively the conversation about badges has been, which — thanks to our Badges for Lifelong Learning topic on Scoop.it — we were able to easily capture and curate.

Maybe it’s a sign that the most recent blog post about badges is Jon Buckley’s Validating Open Badges article exploring the technology of implementing badges. Since the launch, people have talked about badges upsetting college degrees, motivation and badges, employment and badges, the open in open badges, considering badges, and unpacking the meaning of badges.

With Stage Two closing today, the timing is right to turn to the technology questions, the design, the information architecture, and how to use badges to champion the age of the learner, using the same kind of thinking that made the Internet and connected learning possible.


TEACHER MASTERY AND FEEDBACK BADGE COMPETITION STAGE ONE WINNERS ANNOUNCED

January 12, 2012

January 12, 2012—The 4th HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition today announced the 16 winners of Stage One of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition, held in conjunction with the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition and in collaboration with the Mozilla Foundation. For a list of Stage One winners of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Competition, see below.

Stage One of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Competition requested proposals describing subject and content matter for a teacher badge system that would recognize, reward, and offer peer feedback to teachers regarding mastery of capacities and skills. Submissions were to include systems for recognizing and rewarding some of the capacities, skills and content needed to effectively teach math, literacy, or digital literacy skills and/or to effectively teach to the Common Core State Standards. For example, giving feedback to students, developing complex skills, or skills needed to teach in an environment that privileges digital or online learning.

Stage One winners from the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Competition may be paired with winning badge design/technology teams from Stage Two for the opportunity to advance to Stage Three, during which selected teams will work collaboratively on developing a badge system. After the final round of judging, winning teams will be announced at the Digital Media and Learning Conference in San Francisco, California on March 1, 2012.

Stage Two of the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition is now open. Deadline to submit applications is February 3, 2012 by 5pm PST / 8pm EST.

Stage Two applicants for the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition are invited to propose badging systems for the teacher learning and feedback content of Stage One winners. Competitive submissions proposing badge systems that track and promote feedback regarding the competencies and skills as well as the programs and subjects over which teachers acquire expertise are a central part of the Stage One and Stage Two processes of the Competition.

Stage Two Badge Design and Tech applications may be submitted for both the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Competition (deadline Feb. 3) and the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition (deadline Jan. 17). Click here to view the 60 Stage One winners from the Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition, and the 16 Stage One winners from the Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badges Competition, visit www.dmlcompetition.net.

Stage One: Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badge Content and Programs Winners

Sasha Barab, Center for Impact Games at Arizona State University
Badges for America: Preparing Teachings for the 21st Century

Diane Gal, State University of New York, Empire State College – School for Graduate Studies
Mastery of Open Online Tools for Learning (MOOT4L) Badge Experience

Alex Griswold, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Annenberg Learner Ambassador Badge Program

Richard Ingram, James Madison Partners for Learning
MacArthur Badges for Standards-based ICT Skills for Teachers – United States and Worldwide

Tony Jackson, Asia Society
Pathways to Global Competence: A Badge System for Educators

Cecilia Lenk, The Reynolds Center for Teaching, Learning and Creativity
simSchool BadgeUp: The Digital Badges Approach to Global Teacher Preparation and Accreditation

David Libert, Milwaukee Teacher Education Center
Growing New Pathways to Teacher Certification

Joshua Marks, curriki.org
Curriki Certified Open Educator

Bruce Morrow, Bank Street College of Education
Bank Street Community of Online Practice

MaryFaith Mount-Cors, VIF International Education
Global Gateway: A Global STEM Educator Badging System

Corey Newhouse, Public Profit LLC
California Out-of-School Time Badges Initiative

Leah Potter, American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning
Who Built America? Badges for Teaching Disciplinary Literacy in History

Rebecca Schultz, KQED
Science Media Teacher Mastery and Feedback Badges

Robin Shoop, Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy
Computer Science Student Network Teacher Badge System

Andrew Stillman, New Visions for Public Schools
YouPD: Rethinking Professional Development for Teachers

Kris Swanson, Poinciana Elementary STEM Magnet School
Elementary STEM Teacher Certification Project

HASTAC/MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Competition

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation launched the Digital Media and Learning initiative in 2006 to help determine how digital technologies are changing the way people, especially young people, learn, play, socialize, and participate in civic life. Answers are critical to developing educational and other social institutions that can meet the needs of this and future generations.
The Digital Media and Learning initiative is marshaling what is already known about the field and seeding innovation for continued growth.
Grant support has been provided to the Digital Media and Learning Competition and to research projects, design studies, pilot programs, and experiments in learning applications, assessment and institutional design, structure and approach.

HASTAC (the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) is an international network of educators and digital visionaries committed to the creative development and critical understanding of new technologies in life, learning, and society. HASTAC is committed to innovative design, participatory learning, and critical thinking.

Mozilla is a global, nonprofit organization dedicated to making the Web better. It emphasizes principle over profit, and believes that the Web is a shared public resource to be cared for, not a commodity to be sold. Mozilla works with a worldwide community to create open source products like Mozilla Firefox, and to innovate for the benefit of the individual and the betterment of the Web. The result is great products built by passionate people and better choices for everyone.